The Morgan Samuels Perspective

Should I Take an Executive Recruiter's Call?

Posted by Morgan Samuels on Mon, Oct 31, 2016

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The short answer, YES! As Lynn Wu, Principal at Morgan Samuels, acknowledges, when you are happy with your current job, you might feel reluctant to take an executive recruiter’s call—but you shouldn’t be.  Recruiters are incredible assets to professionals.  In fact, executive recruiters provide potential candidates with tangible benefits that go far beyond the actual role being discussed during a recruiting call.  So, if you are a professional who is not actively looking, why should you take a call from an executive search firm?

  1. It’s the Best Time to Consider Opportunities.  The time to consider new opportunities is not when you are hunting for a job. Instead, as a professional, you should evaluate your career opportunities when you have been doing well in your current organization.  It is at this time that you are the most marketable, and an outside opportunity may provide you the opportunity to leverage your current success for a career-defining position that will take you to the next level.  Being happy in your current role allows you to evaluate opportunities objectively.  The pressure is off.  And oftentimes, the fact that you are not looking for a new role makes you an even more attractive candidate. If the opportunity you are evaluating is not an attractive next step for you, you're not obligated to move forward.
  2. It’s a Great Networking Opportunity.  Networking at the executive level is vital for future career success.  When you go through the recruiting process with an elite executive search firm like Morgan Samuels, we take the time to interview you in depth and to understand what’s truly important to you.  Even if you aren’t the right fit for the current role being discussed, you may be the perfect fit for a future search.  In addition, as you learn more about the opportunity through interviewing with the client, that also represents a valuable networking opportunity with one or more senior executives at another firm.  In the Engineering & Construction industry, for example, it is not uncommon to see joint ventures and other partnerships come out of what was initially an interview.  In other cases, a candidate might end up being considered for a different opportunity within the same organization.  We have even seen a client company create a position for a candidate who doesn't quite fit the open role, but whose skills, talents, experience and cultural fit are too valuable to pass up. Even if you decide that the open position isn’t the right fit for you or the client moves forward with another candidate instead, it is still time well spent to have met top executives in your industry.   
  3. It’s the Perfect Time to Pay It Forward and Provide a Referral.  Another reason to take a search firm's call, even if you are satisfied in your current position, is that recruiters are always sincerely appreciative of referrals.  This starts a relationship between you and the recruiter (see #5 below for why that is important). At Morgan Samuels, we genuinely value and foster our relationships with candidates and sources as much as with clients. The people being referred -- your colleagues -- will also be grateful.  This fosters mutually beneficial business relationships, and well… it’s just good karma.
  4. Recruiters Are Subject Matter Experts.  Executive recruiters are excellent resources and subject matter experts about the industries they recruit for.  They have a good understanding of current compensation rates, market trends, key insights, etc.  They are industry experts in their chosen specialty.  You should take advantage of this fact.  Even if you aren’t actively seeking a new position, perhaps taking the call from that recruiter will provide you with important information on growing business trends in your area of specialty.  Recruiters are goodcontacts to have and can also provide valuable insights to help further your career.  In addition to career guidance, they can provide interview and resume feedback, and generally help you understand how you are being perceived in the marketplace.
  5. In This Economy, It’s Important to Know Recruiters.  While the economy has improved substantially, it is not what it used to be - especially for job seekers.  Now more than ever, it is critical for an executive to be on a first-name basis with a competent and knowledgeable recruiter.  You should always be building your network, in any case.  Indeed, you should know recruiters before you have to use them.  Morgan Samuels keeps in touch with our candidates over decades and we truly value the long-term relationships we’re able to establish and maintain with our candidates over the years. 

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Final Words of Advice: 

  1. Return the recruiter’s call promptly.
  2. Be up front with the recruiter about your capabilities, credentials, and current compensation package.
  3. Be open to sending your resume to the recruiter for consideration for future opportunities even if the role being discussed is not a fit.  Having your resume on file enables you to be more quickly considered for new searches that launch in the future, since search firms will check their internal database and networks first.  You may also want to keep abreast of current open searches at a firm you have connected with.  That way, when you see a role that interests you, you can reach out to the recruiter you know to get the scoop and throw your hat into the ring. Morgan Samuels' list of active engagements can be viewed by clicking here.
  4. Be open-minded to exploring an opportunity even if the location is not ideal.  There are so few senior-level positions the higher up you go in your career, that to take your career to the next level, it is important to be flexible when it comes to location.
  5. Keep in mind that, even if you don't end up taking the position, going through the recruiting and interviewing process in and of itself is valuable, from the standpoint of deepening yourrelationship with the executive search firm, and networking with the client company, as well as sharpening your interviewing skills and refining your resume.

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Lynn Wu, Principal

To learn how you can work with Lynn or any of our recruiting professionals 

on finding your next great recruit, visit us here today. 

 

For career guidance as well as Morgan Samuels’ candidate tools and resources, click here.

 

Topics: executive recruiters, morgan samuels, executive search firms, compensation, executive search, executive search consultants, resume tips, interview tips, talent

Interviewing by Video Conference?  Avoid These 10 Pitfalls.

Posted by Morgan Samuels on Wed, Aug 17, 2016

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You've submitted your resume, received the call for an interview and then find out it's via video conference.  No problem, right?  Video conferencing is being employed more frequently as a tool to help connect hiring managers and executive candidates quickly, efficiently, and economically. Without the right preparation, however, video conference meetings can hurt instead of help an executive move to the second round of interviews. 

Below are our top ten pitfalls to avoid just in time for your next video conference interview:


10.  Poor internet connectivity
You can do everything right, but if you don’t have sufficient internet access, you will surely frustrate yourself and the interviewer. Nothing is more painful than listening to a candidate apologize profusely about their internet connection. It makes it hard to visualize an executive in a senior leadership position. 

9.  Thinking a video conference is the same as a casual meeting
You may use Skype every day to talk to your brother in Europe, but don’t confuse your next video conference interview with a friendly chat online. The same interview engagement rules apply. Be relaxed, but confident and buttoned up as well. Professionalism is always in style and always appropriate.

8.  Overlooking your background
If you need to do a video conference interview on a laptop (and not in an office), be sure to preview the image that the other side will see. You don't want the interviewer to be so distracted by a sloppy background (piles of papers, opened drawers, dingy furniture), that it is hard for them to imagine you in a corner office.

7.  Not spending the time upfront to address image and sound issues
Most organizations will happily (and gratefully) conduct a test of the connection in advance of the actual interview. After all, they don't want to experience technical problems on their end, either. Feel free to request a test before the day of the interview to iron out any audio or image issues and ensure a smooth connection.

6.  Slouching or leaning back
What would seem like a pleasant relaxed pose in person can often look like really bad posture on camera. Take a cue from your second grade teacher and sit up straight.

5.  Body language
What applies to behavior in person also applies during a video conference.  Don't fidget, don't fuss with your hair or your clothes, don't allow yourself to appear distracted, etc. You want to appear professional and focused and your body language says as much about that as your words do (if not more). One thing you should allow yourself to do is SMILE (when appropriate).

4.  Thinking any lighting will do
Conduct the interview in an open, well-lit space. Spot lighting and dim rooms make people look tired and unattractive. Avoid being lit from behind (e.g., sitting in front of a bright window), as you will appear on camera in silhouette. Make sure there is sufficient lighting in front of you to make your facial expressions easy to discern. After all, that's one of the main reasons to do a video conference in the first place! 

3.  Not dressing for the camera
Stripes and small patterns create a busy effect on computer and television screens. Solid colors (other than black or white) read better. Women should avoid shiny jewelry, dangly earrings, dewy makeup, and glossy lipstick. These all appear exaggerated on camera.

2.  Not adjusting the camera position
If you are using a laptop to do a video conference, we recommend placing it on a stack of books so you are not looking down on the laptop’s camera. This is usually a very unflattering angle and even the slimmest people look like they have a double chin.

1.  Looking at the picture and not the camera
It’s hard not to look at the face you see on the computer (or your own face while you are talking). However, if you want to present the most professional and commanding image, try to focus your gaze at the camera. It will come across that you are looking your interviewer in the eye. This takes some practice, but it is well worth the effort.

 

 What are some tips that you use during video conferencing? Tell us in the comments below!

 

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Topics: executive search, C-suite, interview tips, talent

Not Sure You Want the Job? Do Your Homework Anyway!

Posted by Morgan Samuels on Wed, Jul 20, 2016

It’s common advice that the key to nailing an interview for a job you want is preparation.  But what about an interview for a job you don’t necessarily want?

stocksnap_homework.jpg“Even if you’re not interested -- prepare,” says Bert Hensley, Morgan Samuels’ Chairman and CEO. After all, there may be
 an upcoming opening that is more appealing – either at this company or at another client company through the executive search firm.  “If you get good feedback from a client, then search firms will think of you again.  You have an audience beyond who’s in the room.”  

Executive search firms place candidates in two broad categories: active and passive.  Active candidates are actively seeking new employment, while passive candidates are generally happy in their current roles. 

“Passive candidates sometimes don’t prepare like they should.  There’s a perception among executives that they benefit from being coy or playing hard to get in the interview process,” Mr. Hensley says.  “In my experience, that’s not the case.”

 “Go in prepared, or you’re better off not doing it,” he advises. 

 

How to Prepare: 

  • Know Your Numbers. Be able to quantify your own performance, but also understand the performance of the company.  If the company is public, read their annual reports online. 
  • Know Their Story, and Yours. Be able to describe your career as a narrative and a journey.  How did you get where you are? What have you learned?  Also know the hiring company’s story.  Know its history and read through recent press releases to learn recent developments.  Research the professional background of the interviewer. 
  • Know the Industry. Research what trends are impacting the company, both positively and negatively.
  •  Ask Pointed Questions. Why is the position available?  What are their expectations?  What roadblocks would you face?  Are there opportunities for growth for someone in this position?  Both parties need to understand whether the placement is a good fit or it won’t last long, if you do decide you want it.

 Remember: interviewing for a job is always great practice, even if you’re not sure you’re interested in it. Look at it as an opportunity to shake the rust off your interviewing skills. That way, when you get to interview for your dream job, you’re ready to nail it.

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Topics: executive recruiters, morgan samuels, leadership, human capital consultants, executive search firms, retained search firms, interview tips, talent